Email Sign-Up Go to Shopping Cart (0)
 
 
EVERYDAY LOW PRICES ON PET SUPPLIES - 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEE - FREE SHIPPING on orders $49 or more*
HOME »    ARTICLES »    PHARMACY »    MEDICATION SPOTLIGHTS »    PHARMACY SPOTLIGHT: VIBRAMYCIN®
Shop Clearance
Refills
Save Time! Download our Prescription Fax Form PDF before you go to the veterinarian
Pet owners stay informed
Our Heartworm
Guarantee
Flea & Tick
No prescription required for Flea & Tick Control
Horses
Ferrets
Ordering Information
Full Prescription
Product List
Veterinarians
FREE Prescription Resource Guides
Pharmacy Articles
About Our Pharmacy
1-800-447-3021
Disposal of Unused Medicines

  

Pharmacy Spotlight: Vibramycin®


Drs. Foster & Smith Educational Staff
TOP VIEWED ARTICLES
Introducing Quellin™ (Carprofen) Soft Chews from Bayer 
Pharmacy Spotlight: Ketoconazole (Nizoral) 
Pharmacy Spotlight: Corticosteroids 
PRODUCTS RELATED TO:
Medication Spotlights
Ketoconazole (Generic)
Ketoconazole (Generic)
As low as $1.49
Comfortis Chewable Tablets (Brand)
Comfortis Chewable Tablets (Brand)
As low as $89.99
Spotlight on Vibramycin

  • Medication type: Prescription-only antibiotic of the tetracycline class.

  • Active ingredient: Doxycycline

  • Dosage form: Oral suspension; generic form available in tablet or capsule.

  • Manufacturer: Pfizer

  • Generic Form: Doxycycline

  • Major use: Vibramycin® is prescribed by veterinarians as an extra-label drug (not officially approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but commonly used in animal medicine). It is mainly used to fight organisms not susceptible or sensitive to other antibiotics. Vibramycin® is often used for infections caused by bacteria and other microorganisms that are not susceptible to common antibiotics. Can be used for bacterial infections such as wounds, urinary infections, and blood-borne infections. It is the antibiotic of choice for Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and anaplasmosis.

  • How it works: Vibramycin® inhibits protein synthesis in bacteria, rickettsia, and other susceptible organisms, killing them.

Vibramycin SUCCESS STORY:

Dog's Name: Roscoe
Breed: Female Mixed Breed
Age: 11 years

Rottweiler His story: Roscoe was a big Rottweiler and one of the nicest dogs we had known. He was 11 and had no major problems since a knee injury when he was two. We fixed that and always looked forward to seeing him.

One morning, Roscoe's owner, Francesca, called and said the night before, he had been lying next to her on the couch, and one of his front paws was tucked under her leg. When she reached down to stroke his leg, she noticed that it felt different than normal. She got up and looked and realized that it was almost twice the size as normal. She put some ice on the swelling right away.

Outcome: We saw Roscoe the next day and the swelling had not gone down. In fact, it had gotten worse and had moved up to the "wrist" area of his leg. We x-rayed it right away. The x-rays showed nothing significant, so our next thought was Lyme Disease, which is carried by the deer tick. We have a lot of deer and, consequently, a lot of deer ticks up here in northern Wisconsin.

We did a simple blood test, which tests for antibodies to four diseases including: Heartworm, Lyme disease, and two other tick-borne diseases: Ehrlichiosis, caused by Ehrlichia canis, and Anaplasmosis, caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Roscoe tested positive for anaplasmosis.

Anaplasmosis is an emerging tick disease transmitted by the same tick that spreads Lyme disease. The symptoms of the two diseases are similar, as well as the treatment: An antibiotic called Vibramycin® (Doxycycline), given daily. Therefore, we sent Roscoe home with a prescription and asked Francesca to call us with questions and keep us updated on Roscoe's condition.

The Vibramycin® did its job and the swelling went down to normal within a week.

Roscoe lived to the ripe old age of 14 without any further complications from this disease.

For full details on this medication, download the free patient information sheet.

Click here for a more printer-friendly version of this article.  
Click here for a pdf version of this article.  

 

 



Contact us