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Shetland Sheepdog


Drs. Foster & Smith Educational Staff
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The Shetland Sheepdog is more commonly known as the Sheltie.
The Shetland Sheepdog, commonly referred to as the Sheltie, looks like a smaller version of the Collie. The Sheltie is a good choice for those looking for a smaller breed that does well with other dogs, other pets, and children.
The Shetland Sheepdog is more commonly known as the Sheltie.

Interesting Breed Facts:
Popularity: 19th in 2008; with 10,188 registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC).
First recognized as a breed: The breed was first recognized by the AKC in 1911 as the “Shetland Collie” until its name was changed to the Shetland Sheepdog in 1914.
AKC Grouping: Herding.
Appearance: The Sheltie appears to be slightly longer than it is tall. The Shetland Sheepdog appears to be slightly
longer than it is tall. The head is long and has a gentle expression. The eyes are medium-sized, dark, and almond shaped. The ears are carried erect with the tips of the ears folded over. The nose is black. The tail is long and straight. The Sheltie possesses a double coat. The coat colors may be black, blue merle, or sable, and may be marked with varying amounts of white and/or tan.
Medical conditions to watch for: Shelties are prone to thyroid problems. Regular veterinarian exams are essential as medications are available to help control this condition.
Preferences: Capable of living in a smaller environment, such as an apartment, as long as his daily exercise requirements are met.
Best features: Generally accepts and does well with other dogs, other pets, and children. Life span averages between 12 and 14 years.
Biggest challenge to owners: In general, the Sheltie is extremely easy to train. May require a fair amount of training to control barking, which is a trait they are well known for. Fairly playful and enjoys a good game in the yard.
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